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Fig.1. Place-Based Social Media Modes (Click to enlarge).

I’ve just returned from a road trip where I’ve been explaining the different types of place-based social media to brands, agencies and networks. I’m committing my talks to a white paper, but in the meantime, I thought it would be useful to post parts of it here.

This first post describes three types of place-based social media engagement; Passive, Active and Interactive.

Place-based social media does not have to be real-time, interactive or require a specific lean-forward mode of engagement. Understanding how to optimize out of home engagement requires an awareness of the end user’s availability (to consume content) and ability to participate as well as an appreciation of the environment for their engagement, the Digital Out of Home network’s capabilities and the stakeholder’s objectives. Those considerations map to three modes of out-of-home engagement; Passive, Active and Interactive (See Fig.1), each of which maps to distinct applications that can optimize the engagement strategy for locations (retail, hospitality, fitness, health care etc) and brands.

PASSIVE PLACE-BASED SOCIAL MEDIA
Passive place-based social media is best used where the dwell time and or the available time on the DOOH content loop is under 30 seconds. The key attributes of passive place-based social media are:
- It displays contextual, targeted, curated, social media on DOOH screens without a call to action.
- It cannot be influenced by the DOOH audience.
- It can be operated by DOOH networks of any capability.
- As its name implies, passive place-based social media, without a call to action or enough time to engage, does not support any DOOH user interactions.

ACTIVE PLACE-BASED SOCIAL MEDIA
Active place-based social media is best used where the dwell time and or the available time on the DOOH content loop is at least 30 seconds. The key attributes of active place –based social media are:
- It displays contextual, targeted, curated, social media on DOOH screens with a call to action.
- It can be influenced by the DOOH audience but not in real time – either due to limitations of infrastructure or time required by brands/venues to ensure content is adequately filtered, moderated and/or curated.
- It can be operated by DOOH networks with minimum Internet connectivity.
- Active place-based social media, with a call to action and up to 15 seconds to engage, typically has enough time for only one DOOH user interaction.

INTERACTIVE PLACE-BASED SOCIAL MEDIA
Interactive place-based social media is best used where the dwell time and or the available time on the DOOH content loop is at least 60 seconds. The key attributes of interactive place-based social media are:
Displays real-time contextual, targeted, curated, social media on DOOH screens.
- Can be influenced by the DOOH audience in real time.
- Can be operated by DOOH networks of with real-time Internet connectivity.
- Interactive place-based social media, with a call to action and at least 60 seconds to engage, typically has enough time for more than one DOOH user interaction and supports more complex interaction models.

In 15 Seconds Or More (Part 2) I’ll cover the seven steps in the user engagement path.

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Found this at Adverblog. A bakery in London is using Baker Tweet to announce what is being cooked in their kitchen.


BakerTweet from POKE on Vimeo.

It’s a neat tool, it’d be great for Wiffiti Pro. We’d use it to send out a tweet for every feature we release, and then as we upgrade all the features. Good times :)

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Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die, Heath & Heath

Director of Community Jayne Karolow says, “A fun primer on stickiness… Takes the ideas of Gladwell’s Tipping Point and tests them against practical applications. Will the Chumby last? What about the Golden Oreo? Sadly, I could spend way too many hours thinking about those questions…”

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Predictably Irrational, Dan Ariely

CEO Stephen Randall says, “A fun way to discover (yet again) that we are all programmed in a way that marketers can and do exploit.”

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Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, Abelson & Sussman

Senior Systems Engineer Nick Hanssens says, “SICP shaped the way I think about engineering by getting deeply into the essence of what programming problems are and explaining how to represent them.”

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